Updates

We're supporting local, sustainable agriculture

Maine has so many healthy, local farms, but we import more of our food from out of state than any other state in the continental U.S. Too much of this imported food comes from big factory farms that pollute waterways, foul the air and fuel global warming. We’re working to change this by enabling Maine’s small, sustainable farms to feed more of our state.

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Maine floating turbine research on track as new report pushes offshore wind

A consortium of environmental groups released a report Thursday touting the value of offshore wind power along the Atlantic seaboard and urges federal and state governments to act aggressively to support its development, even as Maine researchers are moving toward placing a scale model of a floating turbine in the Gulf of Maine next spring.

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Report: Tax Incentives Vital for Wind Power Development

Renewable energy advocates in Maine issued a report today spelling out what they believe must be done to make offshore wind power a reality. The report details what supporters see as the economic and environmental benefits of offshore wind in Maine. 

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Maine offshore wind topic of new report

A new report spells out what has to be done to make offshore wind power off Maine's coast a reality.

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News Release | Environment Maine

At Debate, King and Dill Reject Tar Sands Pipeline Through Maine

E2 Tech held a debate this morning for Maine’s U.S. Senate Candidates at the University of Southern Maine’s Hannaford Hall in Portland. Environment Maine Director Emily Figdor released the following statement in response:

“The highlight was Angus King and Cynthia Dill both describing how reckless it would be to bring hot, corrosive tar sands oil through an old oil pipeline that passes right next to Sebago Lake. A tar sands oil spill in Sebago Lake, like the spill two years ago in Michigan’s Kalamazoo River, would be devastating. Sebago Lake should remain pristine and be a place where families can continue to go for generations to come."

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Mainers gain on oil-free objective

The sound of heating systems coming to life this month is a rude awakening, following a warm and sunny summer. But it's a sound that's being heard less often in Maine, when it comes to oil heat.

The amount of heating oil burned in Maine homes in 2010 declined to levels not seen since 1984. Consumption has been falling steadily since 2004 and is expected to continue
The total amount of heating oil burned in Maine households was cut by more than half from 2004 to 2010, to about 189 million gallons.

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