Updates

A legacy of protecting salmon.

Environment Maine has a decade-long record of efforts to protect the Atlantic salmon. Most recently, we successfully challenged an EPA regulation that would have allowed the spraying of pesticides into salmon-bearing streams and rivers.

Headline

Master guide opposes bill that changes LURC role

Master Maine guide Bill Stevens has been following the progress of LD 1798, a bill that would turn land use regulation of the unorganized territories over to county governments, and is wholeheartedly against it.

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LURC's role needs to be reaffirmed, not subject to local political pressure

Scenic beauty, peace and quiet, a sense of remoteness -- qualities it is impossible to assign a dollar value to -- are resources as important to the tourist industry and to Maine residents alike as a sustainable wood supply is to the forest-products industry.

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Headline

Lawmakers make some progress on LURC reform bill

Members of a legislative committee began vetting a list of proposed reforms to the Land Use Regulation Commission on Thursday but opted to delay until next week debate on the most contentious issue surrounding the agency.

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News Release | Environment Maine

Every Maine County Hit By At Least One Recent Weather Disaster; New Report Says Global Warming to Bring More Extreme Weather

After a year that saw many parts of the country hit by scorching heat, devastating wildfires, severe storms and record flooding, a new Environment Maine report documents how global warming could lead to certain extreme weather events becoming even more common or more severe in the future.  The report found that, already, every Maine county has been hit by at least one federally declared weather-related disaster since 2006.

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Report | Environment Maine Research & Policy Center

In the Path of the Storm

Since 2006, federally declared weather-related disasters in the United States have affected counties housing 242 million people – or roughly four out of five Americans. The breadth and severity of weather-related disasters in the United States – coupled with the emerging science on the links between global warming and extreme weather – suggest that the United States should take strong action to reduce emissions of global warming pollution and take steps to protect communities from global warming-fueled extreme weather events.

 

 

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