Updates

Keystone XL approval is wrong direction

By facilitating the transportation of dirty tar sands fuels, Keystone would add 27.4 million metric tons of global warming pollution to our atmosphere per year. President Trump's executive order advancing the Keystone XL pipeline is definitely a step in the wrong direction. READ MORE.

News Release | Environment Maine

Maine Legislature Takes Strong Stand on Toxic Chemicals

Reflecting an overwhelming bipartisan consensus, the Maine Legislature passed a Joint Resolution Tuesday calling on Congress to modernize the federal Toxic Substances Control Act of 1976. The vote was unanimous in both the Maine Senate and the Maine House of Representatives.

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Maine voters back pro-environment Senate candidate

A pair of environmental groups say a poll they commissioned shows that Maine voters will back a U.S. Senate candidate this fall who favors reducing carbon pollution and stronger protections against dangerous chemicals.

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News Release | Environment Maine

Get Rid of Toxic Products, Maine Lawmakers Tell Congress

Reflecting a bipartisan consensus, Maine legislative leaders introduced a joint resolution today calling on Congress to modernize the federal Toxic Substances Control Act of 1976. Maine moms, dads, businesses, and health care providers have heightened thir call for reform of the chemical safety law that they say is obsolete and fails to assure parents that the products they use and purchase are free from dangerous chemicals that threaten the health of their families.

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Environmental Groups React to FDA Rejection of BPA Ban

State environmental groups are disappointed with the Food and Drug Administration's decision last week to reject a petition from the Natural Resources Defense Council to ban bisphenol-A, or BPA, from food and drink packaging. The FDA said it needs more evidence that the plastic-hardening agent is harmful to humans. While Maine has already banned BPA from baby bottles and sippy cups, supporters of a widespread ban said federal action would have reduced overall BPA exposure by two-thirds.

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