Updates

We're supporting local, sustainable agriculture

Maine has so many healthy, local farms, but we import more of our food from out of state than any other state in the continental U.S. Too much of this imported food comes from big factory farms that pollute waterways, foul the air and fuel global warming. We’re working to change this by enabling Maine’s small, sustainable farms to feed more of our state.

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Portland Press Herald: Proposed tar sands ban gets standing ovation in South Portland

SOUTH PORTLAND — The auditorium at Mahoney Middle School rocked Wednesday night with a standing ovation and cheers for a proposal that would block tar sands oil from coming into the city...

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New EPA Rules Follow Maine's Lead on Environment

Angus King's new editorial expresses his concerns about climate change and his support for the new EPA regulations on power plants. 

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News Release | Environment Maine

Maine Leaders Hail Carbon Pollution Standards as Bold Step on Global Warming

In the most significant step the United States has ever taken to reduce the pollution causing global warming, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency today announced the first-ever national carbon pollution standards for existing power plants.

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MPBN: Supporters: Maine Has Head Start on New Federal Carbon Rules

Several environmental leaders, scientists and business representatives in Maine have welcomed new rules for cutting carbon dioxide emissions from power plants. This follows the announcement today by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency of a plan to reduce carbon emissions by 30 percent by 2030, compared to 2005 levels. Supporters say Maine already has a head start on complying with the new rules. 

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Bangor Daily News: EPA wants Maine power plants to cut emissions 13.5 percent by 2030

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency wants Maine power plants to reduce emissions by 13.5 percent in 16 years, as part of a national plan to reduce emissions by 30 percent, from 2005 levels, by 2030.

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